The Journal of Bucharest College of Physicians and the Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences

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Thursday, May 24 2018 @ 07:42 EEST

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A Retrospective Clinical Study of 640 Scoliosis Treated by Posterior Segmental Rachisynthesis

2014-01

M. Jianu, A. Thiery, Beatrice Frumușeanu, Raluca Damean, Violeta Oriță

Although the scoliosis has in Romania relatively the same incidence as in most of the European countries, it is usually late diagnosed, when the Cobb angle has significant values.

Since 2010, Romania has a program of screening and early treatment of spine deformities funded by The Ministry of Health.

In a 14 years period in Pediatric Orthopedic Department of Central Emergengy Hospital for Children "Grigore Alexandrescu" Bucharest and also in the private hospitals "Regina Maria" and "Sanador" were examined and diagnosed 14.853 patients with scoliosis.

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Reactive Thrombocytosis in Pediatric Pathology

2014-01

Alina Deaconu, Cătălina Bica, D. Bulucea

Thrombocytosis (over 500.000/mmc) is classified as primary (clonal) or secondary (reactive). Increasing the number of platelets as response to various stimuli (inflammatory diseases, acute and recurrent bleeding, systemic infections or various types of malignancies) are considered to be reactive thrombocytosis [1,2,3].

Clonal or primary thrombocytosis (PT) is an abnormality of platelets production caused by clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In primary thrombocytosis autonomous platelets production is not regulated by physiological feedback mechanisms to maintain platelets count normal.

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The Dietotherapy of Malignant Degeneration of Small Intestine and Colon, Correlated with the Anticancerous Therapy

2014-01

T. Mogoș, Andra Evelin Iacobini

The presence of primary or metastatic cancer in small intestine has as a first line treatment the segmental resection. We reach the same therapeutic conduct in case of cancerous patients exposed to abdominal radiation therapy, sometimes severily affecting the small intestine (perforations, strictures, hemorrhages, fistulae). The nutritional implications of intestinal resection are significant, given the role of small intestine in digestion and absorbtion of nutricious principles, and the maintainance of enterohepatic circulation of biliary salts [1].

When we resort to ileal resection, if it does not exceed 100 cm, then a considerable part of biliary salts can not enter the reversed hepatic circuit (the surface for intestinal absorbtion diminishes) and they enter the colon, where they induce a watery diarrhea. It can be avoided if the patient is administered cholestyramine (it binds biliary salts, making them unable to induce diarrhea). Dietary measures alone are not sufficient. We start with 4 grams of cholestyramine per day, dosage after which the diarrhea stops abruptly. Afterwards, the dosage is decreased to half or less. In the mentioned conditions, though a part of the biliary salts loose their capacity to emulsify fats, the absorbtion of fats is not considerably disturbed [2].

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The Dietary Adjustment to the Digestive Systemís Alterations Induced by the Anticancer Therapy

2014-01

T. Mogoș, Andra Evelin Iacobini

The nutrition of patients in which the cancerous disease has already spread does not cure the disease [1]. This statement is radically contrary to multiple theories supported by some followers of these cancer specific diets (ex. the shark cartilage diet, the distilled water and wheat seeds diet, etc.). This situation is also encountered in the neoplasm of the digestive system [1].

The objectives of the cancerous diseaseís nutrition are represented by the ability to provide the caloric and nutritional requirements which are able to improve the patientís clinical status, to increase the effort capacity, to extend the survival duration and to amplify the capacity to tolerate chemotherapy and radiation therapy [2].

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Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients with Heart Failure Hospitalized in the Clinical Emergency Hospital ofBucharest

2014-01

Camelia C. Diaconu, Bianca Paraschiv, Daniela Bartoș

Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome that can be determined by any structural or functional cardiac disease that impairs the ability of the left ventricle to fill or eject blood. In developed countries, heart failure is a main cause of morbidity and mortality for adults older than 65 years, the risk of developing heart failure being increased with advancing age. Heart failure hospitalizations are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Understanding factors that influence clinical outcomes of patients hospitalized for heart failure, particularly the modifiable ones, may be useful for identifying strategies to improve the outcomes of these patients.

The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients with chronic heart failure consecutively admitted in the Internal Medicine Clinic of the Clinical Emergency Hospital of Bucharest, during a period of 8 months (1st of January - August 31, 2012).

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