The Journal of Bucharest College of Physicians and the Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences

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The Management of Facial Fibrous Dysplasia

2014-02

V. Zainea, O. Ceachir, Mura Hainăroșie, Irina G Ioniță, Andreea Sorică, R. Hainăroșie

Fibrous dysplasia is a benign condition consisting in replacement of normal bone with fibrous tissue and unorganized bone woven (1). The malignant change to osteosarcoma can appear in less than 1% of cases (2). Osteosarcoma is found most often, but other lesions as fibrosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and malignant fibrohistiocytoma are reported (3,4).

Fibrous dysplasia appears due to somatic activation of mutation in the G protein encoded by the gene GNAS. GNAS gene mutations cause McCune-Albright syndrome defined by the triad of PFD, café-au-lait skin macules and endocrinopathies, including amongothers, precocious puberty (5). It is caused by a random mutation in the GNAS gene that occurs very early in development.

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Zinc and Androgen Hormones in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

2014-02

C. Ene, Corina Daniela Ene (Nicolae), Ilinca Nicolae, L. Coman, Oana Andreia Coman

Prostatic pathology represents one of the most common causes of dermato-urological addressability, because of the varied age interval, but also because of the symptoms that decrease rapidly and visibly the patients’ quality of life.

Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) is represented by increased volume of the prostate, which generates an obstructive and irritative symptomathology in the pelvic urinary tract. The hormonal influence presents a certain contribution in the development and evolution of BPH, by the imbalance occurred between androgens and estrogens, revealed by the significant decrease of the ratio androgens/estrogens hormones and by the inflammatory factors (1,2,3,4).

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Predictors of Increased Arterial Stiffness in Hypertensive Patients

2014-02

Oana Florentina Tăutu, Roxana Darabont, S. Onciul, A. Deaconu, Ioana Petre, R.D. Andrei, B. Drăgoescu, Maria Dorobanțu

In Romania, a high cardiovascular (CV) risk East European country, where prevalence of hypertension is still high and optimal blood pressure control still represents a doubtfull challange (1-5), adopting a treatment approach strategy based on total cardiovascular risk assessment can maximize the costeffectiveness of hypertensive patinets management, ensuring the best use of the limited resources of our health-care system, to prevent cardiovascular diseses and to decrease CV morbidity and mortality.

Recent research show that increased arterial stiffness represents an independent predictor of fatal and non-fatal CV events in hypertensive patients (6-10).

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Upper Digestive Tract Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

2014-02

Adriana-Corina Andrei, Larisa-Elena Fulger, L.S. Andrei, G. Becheanu, Mona Dumbrava, Carmen-Monica Preda, M.M. Diculescu

Inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, idiopathic diseases characterized by the inflamation of the wall tube (1). Ulcerative colitis was first described in the mid-1800s (2), whereas Crohn's disease was first reported later, in 1932, as "regional ileitis" (3). Because Crohn's disease can involve the colon and shares clinical manifestations with ulcerative colitis, these entities have often been conflated and diagnosed as inflammatory bowel disease, although they are clearly distinct physiopathological entities. Ulcerative colitis is the most common form of inflammatory bowel disease worldwide. In contrast to Crohn's disease that can extend in the entire intestinal wall, ulcerative colitis is a disease of the mucosa that is less prone to complications and can be cured by means of colectomy, and in many patients, its course is mild (4).

Until recently, it was considered that, unlike Crohn's disease (whose location can be at any level of the digestive tract), ulcerative colitis is strictly localized in the colon. However, in the recent years, increasingly more studies reveal the existence of a moderate, chronic, diffuse gastroduodenitis in pacient with ulcerative colitis, which normally causes no macroscopical lesions being highlighted only based on histopathologic examination (5). Most of these studies invoke the presence in the duodenum of a diffuse inflamation with neutrophilic infiltration in the glandular crypts, with redness and swelling during an acute exacerbation. In the stomach the predominant lesions are chronic focal gastritis (5,6,7).

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Left Atrial Function in Patients with Reentrant Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia with Narrow QRS Complex - The Role of..

2014-02

Left Atrial Function in Patients with Reentrant Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia with Narrow QRS Complex - The Role of Speckle Tracking Echocardiography

Adriana Alexandrescu, S. Onciul, Ioana Petre, Oana Tautu, A. Scafa, Maria Dorobanțu

The reentrant paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias with narrow QRS complex are in a large majority represented by atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT) and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). From an electrophysiological (EP) point of view the difference between the two forms is made by the type of the reentry circuit. That means that the former requires an accessory pathway with retrograde conduction while the latter implies the existence of perinodal pathways.

The left atrium (LA) is a part of the circuit in both types of arrhythmias. In sinus rhythm the left atrium has several functions: it acts as a conduit during protodiastole, it has a contractile function raising the filling pressure during atrial systole but it also has a reservoir function during ventricular systole. (1)

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