The Journal of Bucharest College of Physicians and the Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences

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Tuesday, July 17 2018 @ 04:37 EEST

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Epstein Barr Virus and Cytomegalovirus in Prostate - A Controversial Subject

2015-03

D. Spīnu, O. Bratu, A. Aungurenci, D. Marcu, C. Ursaciuc, G. Isvoranu, I. Peride, A. Niculae, D. Mischianu

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the Herpes Virus family and is also known as Human Herpes Virus 4. The virus was first isolated in 1964 by the British virologists Michael Anthony Epstein and Yvonne Barr, on a cell line derived from a Burkitt lymphoma. EBV infection is especially common in young individuals with low hygiene standards and also low social and economic status. Thereby it is considered that until the third decade of life, around 80 - 100% individuals have become carriers of infection [1,2]. Although EBV is considered to be a lymphotropic B virus, it can also infect T and NK lymphocytes or some epithelial cells, as it has beenfound in T cell lymphomas, stomach, nose, andthroat carcinomas [2]. The most common host cellfor EBV is B lymphocyte, although in some cases the virus can also be detected in epithelial cells. The role of epithelial cells is likely to permit the replication and amplification of EBV persistence than that of the latent infection [3].

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An Overview of Advanced Multimodal Imaging Techniques in Low Grade Gliomas

2015-03

D. Mariș, A. Mohan, H. Moisa, Alexandru Vlad Ciurea

Diffuse infiltrative low-grade gliomas (LGG) of the cerebral hemispheres in adults are a group of tumors with distinct clinical, histological and molecular characteristics. The management of such tumors is still controversial. (1)

In LGG neuroimaging plays a crucial role. Starting of a "watch and wait" management plan has been frequently based solely on imaging. Conventional MRI is a valuable method in conducting a differential diagnosis, assisting surgery, planning radiotherapy and surveying treatment response, but it focuses on structural changes within tumours and often provides limited information only.

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The Additive Value of 2D Longitudinal Strain During Stress Echocardiography in Coronary Artery Disease Detection in Low Risk...

2015-03

The Additive Value of 2D Longitudinal Strain During Stress Echocardiography in Coronary Artery Disease Detection in Low Risk Acute Coronary Syndrome - A Pilot Study

Roxana Onuț, Sebastian Onciul, Cristina Marinescu, Diana Zamfir, Maria Dorobanțu

Approximately 20% of patients arriving in the crowded emergency departments (ED) present with acute chest pain (ACP) and 60% are admitted in order to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In the latter category, the ACS is confirmed only in 15% of patients thus resulting in a huge number of unnecessary admissions and wasted resources. (1) Stratifying ACP as low, moderate or high risk ACS allows physicians to take immediate action, initiate treatment and transfer the patient to the appropriate location.

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Problems with the Monitoring of Patients with Colonic Polyps

2015-03

Csongor Toth, Mircea Ifrim, Ovidiu Hategan, Cris Precup, Gyori Zsolt, Ovidiu Bulzan

Colorectal neoplasm ranks third in incidence and 4th among the most common causes of cancer death worldwide. In Romania, Arad, of all digestive cancers, colorectal cancer is the No. 3, both in incidence - in both men and women - and mortality. Colorectal cancer incidence is estimated to be 10.1 / 100,000 inhabitants in men and 7.3 / 100,000 inhabitants in women.

This paper is a retrospective statistical study, carried out over a period of 5 years. This study includes the monitoring of patients recorded with colonic polyps, within the area of 4 family physician practices. This study was conducted because there was a decrease of addressability (adherence) of patients recorded with having colonic adenomatous polyps. (1)

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Particularities and Surgical Treatment of Constriction Band Syndrome Syndactyly, in Children

2015-03

Doina-Iulia Nacea, Dan Mircea Enescu, Simona Ioana Stoicescu, Raluca Teodora Tatar

Constriction band syndrom syndactyly is a sporadic condition, that may be present in association with other congenital anomalies such as musculoskeletal (including total amputation of the limb), craniofacial (like cleft lip and cleft palate) and thoraco-abdominal disorders (such as gastroschisis and extrathoracic heart), neural tube defects, scoliosis and hemangiomas (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6). Some of these manifestations are uncommonly noted at birth because they result in spontaneous abortion.

There are two main theories about constriction band syndrome etiology, the first of which is the intrinsic theory proposed by George Streeter, the director of embryology at Carnegie Institute, in 1930 which is called, "Streeter’s Dysplasia". Streeter suggested that an intrinsic defect in the subcutaneous germplasm resulted in focal mesenchymal hypoplasia, tissue loss, and scarring (7, 8).

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